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Thessaloniki and Puglia — Diane Seed

Mount Athos My summer passed in a blur of azure Mediterranean seas – first Sifnos, then Ischia, Sardinia and Corsica. I followed this by flying to the UK in August to cook and play schools with my grand-daughters, while Georgina was busy working, and I began to feel I needed to get home and settle […]

via Thessaloniki and Puglia — Diane Seed

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Wiley Humanities Festival 2018: Why Technology Matters: The Humanities in the 21st Century — The Philosopher’s Eye

The field of humanities is changing rapidly, along with the world, as new technologies alter centuries of tradition in various disciplines. In this, the third year of the Wiley Humanities Festival, we’ll focus on the digital humanities, and how technology has revolutionized the way the humanities will be taught, learned, and researched for years to come. The […]

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Congratulations to the winners of the 2017 Philosopher’s Annual! — The Philosopher’s Eye

Each year, The Philosopher’s Annual faces the daunting task of selecting the 10 best articles in philosophy published that year. For 2017, they’ve chosen three articles from journals published by Wiley: Jane Friedman’s article “Why Suspend Judging?” published in Noûs, Derek Parfit’s article “Future People, the Non-Identity Problem, and Person-Affecting Principles,” published in Philosophy & […]

via Congratulations to the winners of the 2017 Philosopher’s Annual! — The Philosopher’s Eye

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World Congress of Philosophy Virtual Issue — The Philosopher’s Eye

By Bailey Morrison Beginning August 13, philosophers from around the globe will gather in Beijing at the World Congress of Philosophy. Organized every five years by the International Federation of Philosophical Societies (FISP), the congress addresses pressing philosophical issues. This year’s theme, “Learning to be Human” discusses the intricacies of humanity. Topics to be addressed […]

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An Interview with Philosopher Robin Zheng

The Philosopher's Eye

Interview conducted by Jacquelyn Kelley

In her article, “Precarity is a Feminist Issue: Gender and Contingent Labor in the Academy,” Robin Zheng establishes that two common myths—“the myth of meritocracy” and “the myth of work as its own reward”—not only reinforce the academic job crisis but also have gendered origins, ultimately allowing gender stereotypes and job insecurity to reinforce one another within the discipline of Philosophy.

Published in the Spring 2018 issue of Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy, Zheng’s research was first presented at the 2016 SWIP UK Conference followed by the 2017 Joint Session at the University of Edinburgh.

Her article was cited by the Australasian Association of Philosophy’s Committee for the Status of Women in Philosophy in their Statement on Insecure Work, and has received notable recognition and praise on social media.

Zheng holds a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Michigan…

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Sifnos, island of cooks and potters.

Diane Seed

We are just home from our 2018 Greek Adventure in Sifnos.

Over the years I had enjoyed many family holidays in Sifnos, at sleepy Vathi where the road stops behind the beach, and the small church and tavernas can only be accessed by sea, or a trudge along the sand.One year, irritated by a work companion who lamented the absence of steaks and hamburgers, I sat alone at Manolis,  enjoying once more Margarita’s delicious filo pie, tsasiki and saganaki, and reflected it was more fun to travel with my cooking school students. After a few glasses of local white wine my mind became clear, and my Greek Idyll was born.

I took small groups to Vathi where we swam, relaxed and cooked for a few hours most days in the local tavernas. We eventually moved on to Symi, in the Dodecanese, where we grew lazier and the lure of the…

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The first day of spring — Diane Seed

Today is the official beginning of spring, Palm Sunday and Greek Independence Day. It seems an auspicious moment to return to my blog and newsletter after a silence of nearly a year. A ruptured Achilles tendon, misdiagnosed in Italy, and subsequent poor medical care, led to several months in a wheelchair, following a successful operation […]

via The first day of spring — Diane Seed

Facing Issues in the Profession – the Problem of Diversity — The Philosopher’s Eye

Since beginning my tenure as managing editor of Hypatia, I have had the pleasure of working closely with individuals who are associated with Hypatia in various ways, and I have been awed by the extraordinary generosity and effort so very many people freely give to Hypatia. One of my most valued experiences at Hypatia has […]

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Reformation: Not for Sale — The Philosopher’s Eye

It is 2017, and it seems that the whole world has descended upon Wittenberg. Luther tours, Luther conferences, small groups with every Lutheran affiliation imaginable, and individual tourists from all over the globe have been traveling to Wittenberg all year. They have been touring the important sites in Luther’s life, and learning about his theology […]

via Reformation: Not for Sale — The Philosopher’s Eye